Why platforms aren’t taking down deceptive political videos

U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during her weekly news conference last week

U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during her weekly news conference last week | Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

Say you run a large social network in which your most zealous users frequently discuss their politics. In 2020, one way they are going to do this is through the sharing of memes — pithy, punchy photos and videos designed for maximum partisan impact. Some of these memes will draw on actual facts; others will simply be insults. The most troublesome memes to deal with will be the ones that draw on real life but manipulate it in some way. These manipulations can be an essential part of satire, parody, and criticism. They can also trick people into believing a hoax. It’s up to you to draw a bright line. Where do you draw it?

The question of manipulated media has come up in a big way twice in the past week. The first came when Twitter said it…

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