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Netflix adds 8.8M paid subscribers globally, says it now accounts for 10 percent of U.S. TV screen time

Netflix just released its fourth quarter earnings report, which looks mixed compared to Wall Street expectations.

The company added 8.8 million subscribers, well above the 7.6 million that it had predicted at the beginning of the quarter. It also beat estimates for earnings per share — analysts had predicted EPS of 24 cents, but actual EPS came in at 30 cents. However, revenue was a bit lower than expected — $4.19 billion, compared to predictions of $4.21 billion.

As of 4:50pm Eastern, Netflix shares were down about 2 percent in after hours trading.

The investor letter also includes viewership numbers for several popular titles, including “Bird Box,” which the company says will be viewed by more than 80 million households in its first four weeks (45 million accounts streamed the movie in its first week, setting a record for Netflix). It also says that “You” and “Sex Education” are on-track to be viewed by more than 40 million households in their first four weeks on the service.

And these aren’t just people accidentally tuning in for a few seconds — Netflix says it only counts someone as a viewer of they watch at least 70 percent of a movie or an episode.

The letter emphasizes the popularity of these original shows and movies as a way of suggesting that Netflix isn’t reliant on outside studios for its content and continued success.

“As a result of our success with original content, we’re becoming less focused on 2nd run programming,” it says, noting that Netflix originals now account for the majority of unscripted viewing on the service. “We are ready to pay top-of-market prices for second run content when the studios, networks and producers are willing to sell, but we are also prepared to keep our members ecstatic with our incredible original content if others choose to retain their content for their own services.”

Later, the letter returns to the theme of growing competition in the streaming world, claiming that Netflix currently accounts for 100 million hours of viewing per day on U.S. TV screens — which it estimates to be 10 percent of the total. It also suggests that it’s going up against a “very broad set of competitors”: “We compete with (and lose to) ‘Fortnite’ more than HBO.”

“Our focus is not on Disney+ or Amazon, but on how we can improve our experience for our members,” the company says.

from TechCrunch https://tcrn.ch/2T0ZguP

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Alphabet’s health division gets FDA clearance to test EKG smartwatch feature

Alphabet’s health division, Verily, has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its Study smart watch for an “on-demand ECG feature.” The Study Watch, announced in April 2017, is not a consumer smartwatch, but instead meant as a test platform for the Google-adjacent company to research how to best gather health data on a wearable.

Back when it was announced, Verily said that it had an ECG feature alongside the usual stuff you expect on a smartwatch — but it didn’t receive clearance from the FDA for it until today (oddly, in the midst of a government shutdown).

When Apple announced its electrocardiogram feature for the Apple Watch, it seemed like a completely unique and differentiating feature. Now, it’s starting to feel like EKG is about to…

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Shaky rings help scientists measure Saturn’s days

A day on Saturn lasts for 10 hours, 33 minutes, and 38 seconds, according to a paper published in The Astrophysical Journal that used wobbles in Saturn’s rings to make the calculation. That’s several minutes shorter than older approximations of the gas giant’s day, but the new timetable lines up with some previous mathematical estimates.

It was hard for researchers to figure out how long a day was on Saturn for a few reasons. First, the planet has an incredibly thick and rotating atmosphere, which obscured the inner surface. That’s usually not a huge problem. When they can’t see how fast a planet’s surface is spinning, astronomers can generally measure movements in its magnetic field to figure out what’s going on inside. But Saturn’s…

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from The Verge – All Posts http://bit.ly/2MjxJSL
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Shaky rings help scientists measure Saturn’s days

A day on Saturn lasts for 10 hours, 33 minutes, and 38 seconds, according to a paper published in The Astrophysical Journal that used wobbles in Saturn’s rings to make the calculation. That’s several minutes shorter than older approximations of the gas giant’s day, but the new timetable lines up with some previous mathematical estimates.

It was hard for researchers to figure out how long a day was on Saturn for a few reasons. First, the planet has an incredibly thick and rotating atmosphere, which obscured the inner surface. That’s usually not a huge problem. When they can’t see how fast a planet’s surface is spinning, astronomers can generally measure movements in its magnetic field to figure out what’s going on inside. But Saturn’s…

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The FCC has reopened its device approval system during the government shutdown

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is reopening its hardware certification program amid the partial government shutdown, averting a potential delay in releasing new phones and other electronics. The FCC said today that it was reactivating the Equipment Authorization System, reversing a decision announced on January 2nd. Several other FCC services will remain unavailable, and the FCC isn’t offering support staff for the system until after the shutdown ends.

Many electronics must receive FCC certification before going to market, and a prolonged closure could theoretically push back their release. Last week, the Telecommunications Industry Association warned that phone carriers might have to slow the rollout of new 5G phones if the…

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This new app brings Google’s Digital Wellbeing features to all Android phones

A new app takes Google’s Digital Wellbeing features — a set of helpful tools for telling which apps you’re spending too much time in — and opens many of them up to all Android phones. It’s called ActionDash, and it comes from the developer of the home screen customization app Action Launcher.

When you open it, ActionDash shows you a clear breakdown of which apps have been taking up your time today, how many times you’ve unlocked your phone, and how many notifications you’ve received. Swiping to different screens allows you to see breakdowns by day, by hour, and by app.

ActionDash looks and feels almost exactly like Digital Wellbeing. The apps are so similar that while comparing the two side by side on my phone, I frequently had to…

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Copyright Derek T McKinney 2019